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geopolitics -- host: oil and gas production in the western hemisphere is booming, with the united states emerging less dependent on supplies from an unstable middle east. vens, nigeria, and mexico. host: southeast michigan. what are gas prices like there, dave? caller: very good. someone saying on your show that prices were falling for the holidays. that's not true here in southeast michigan, which people here like to drive a lot up north. we have a wonderful, beautiful up north. but the prices here average in the low $3.90's. they were a week ago in the mid $3.60, around there. for my employees, it's all the same for them. we're traveling 60 mile an hour round trips and that really hits the pocketbook when you're having to travel every day for week. i'll companies are certainly quick to bring the price down. thanks and have a good holiday. host: it's not our oil that we're talking about, it belongs to oil companies. new hampshire, john on our democrats line joins us. hi. caller: just one note i've acknowledged over the last few weeks. we have a caller on your show, but he was discussing
incomes were growing more equal in the united states and the great divergence which is a period when incomes were growing more unequal. the pattern towards greater income equality from 34 to 79 was so pronounced that a whole economic theory was built around the idea that this is simply what happened in an advanced industrial economy after the disruption of industrialization in the late 19th and early 20th century, this was theorized you would expect to see a steadily, a move towards tedly more equal -- steadily more equal income. simon -- [inaudible] who formulated this theory essentially said -- he didn't put it quite this way -- but he essentially said it was the mark of a civilized nation that incomes had become more equal. but as you can see, we started becoming uncivilized in 1979. here you see that the trend, the income share of the top 1% which has doubled since 1979 is growing faster the higher up the income scale you go. so it's really being driven by the richest of the rich. when i say income share, i mean the the percentage of the nation's collective income that is going t
, and he said that the united states wanted to be a tremendous partner and cheerleader of the development of brazil's offshore industry. now, mr. president, i have to tell you that was like rubbing salt in the wound of tens of thousands of oil field workers and others who are suffering because of the obama administration policy here in this country really discouraging energy development. the way president obama proposed to be a strong supporter and partner and cheerleader of brazilian offshore development was through an ex-im bank loan and there are many of these sorts of loans. again, in august, 2009, talking about brazil, the case i mentioned, "the wall street journal" reported an editorial that -- quote -- "the u.s. is going to lend billions of dollars to brazil's state-owned oil company, petrobrass to finance exploration of the huge offshore delivery in brazil's oil field near rio de janeiro" -- close quote. again the ex-im bank provided a $2 billion loan to aid brazilian oil production and that's what president obama was cheering and encouraging and making happen. it's happened other
: the clerk will report. the clerk: pule j.watford of california to be united states judge for the ninth circuit. mr. reid: madam president, i ask -- let's see. i have a cloture motion. i want that reported, please. the presiding officer: the clerk will report the motion. clerithe clerk: cloture motion: we, the undersigned senators, in accordance with the provisions of rule 22 of the standing rules of the senate, do hereby move to bring to a close debate on nomination of paul j. wattford of california to be the united states circuit judge for the ninth circuit signed by 17 senators as follows -- mr. reid: madam president, i would ask that the reading of the names be waived. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent that the mandatory quorum under rule 22 be waived. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: i now ask, madam president, the senate resume legislative session. the presiding officer: without objection. the senate resumes legislative session. mr. reid: and what is the pending business? the presiding officer: the motion to proceed to s
be a more dangerous world if the united states were less involved and contributing less to the people and stability and had a weaker deterrent and less ability to dissuade people from engaging in the kinds of adventures that they would avoid were the united states seen as capable, engaged, and contributing to peace and stability. >> next question. mr. faust. >> earlier when you were speaking you mentioned that it's a -- >> this is not fair. they've got computers. he's sitting there reading. >> i can see it, mr. secretary. there's cartoons on it. >> that's a relief. okay. >> but earlier you mentioned, you said it's a battle of ideas referring to the war on terror and similar to the soviet union. but if that's the case, then shouldn't we be worried less about going to war and pre-emptive strikes and those measures and working more on soft power and making -- and focusing inward on america itself so that that way we'll be a country that people want to look up to and be like. because we're suffering from i'd say a lot of maladies right now that make other countries say oh, it doesn't seem
for the economy of the united states. i have been a supporter of the export-import bank since i arrived in congress in 1977. simply put, the ex-im bank supports the sales of american-made products overseas when private finances is not available. -- financing is not available. according to the ex-im bank's 2011 annual report, the bank supported $32.7 billion in exports last year, over 288,000 american jobs. many of these jobs are in the pacific northwest and in my congressional district. i ask unanimous consent to put -- and add additional information. the important point srk let's vote for this bill. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman from california. mr. miller: i'm pleased to yield one minute to the distinguish mad jort leader, the gentleman from virginia, mr. cantor. the chair: the gentleman from virginia is recognized for one minute. mr. cantor: i thank the speaker and i thank the gentleman from california. mr. speaker, i rise today to speak in favor of h.r. 2072, securing american jobs through export act of 2011. make no mistake, i am no fan of government sub
of the united states? we believe the answer is no. we cannot think of a single firm that would be brought down by its exposure to met life. would you agree with that statement? >> met life has been supervised by the federal reserve because it is a bank holding company. >> they are getting rid of their bank holding company. >> once they get rid of their bank holding company they will no longer be supervised by the federal reserve. >> would they come under the ne regulations? >> met life is a nonbank financial company. i'm fairly certain that more than 85% were not assets in nature. >> right. >> so -- i don't think the council has done an analysis -- i know the council has not done an analysis. >> it is a pretty easy question. >> i don't know whether the council plans to designate met life or not. >> that's not your decision. >> it's not our decision. it's a bank holding company right now, so for the moment the council can't -- >> >> the reason i bring that out is the fact that if you take a large company like met life and you treat them like a bank holding company are you gaining anything? is a
's a very good example of where germany could lead in the future and help the united states and the united kingdom to rebuild our badly weak bridges to the russian leadership as president putin takes power and we must do this because russia's just too important and russia is both in some ways an adversary, not in military terms, but politically, but in some ways it's a friend and partner of the united states. we want to accentuate the friendship and partnership. i think chanceler merkel is perfectly placed to be that bridge for the u.s. to russia. >> terry murphy. good day, sir. quick comment and a two-part question. comment number one is you kind of overlooked the trans-atlantic business dialogue which has been going on for 20 years quite prominently. but secondly on the question of germany, last week i think it was captain harry whales, junior officer of the british army, got an award from the beneficiary council for his efforts to support the wounded warriors of britain and we know that the wounded warriors here are supported by the populous. there was a piece in the paper that wounded
on the birth of the united states." professor wood is interviewed by national review's senior editor richard brookhiser. the new york historical society hosted this hour-long event. for coming out on this grim night. but you had a great incentive which is to hear gordon wood. i'm going to begin by paying you, gordon, a round-about compliment. it's a little late, but a nice one. i had dinner with newt gingrich in 1994. and he had -- he had just become speaker elect. the republicans had just captured the house in the '94 election for the first time in 40 years. and at the dinner he talked -- the talk turned to what i was doing. i knew what he was doing. i said i was writing a book on george washington. and without hesitation, he said you have to read "the radicalism of the american revolution" by gordon wood. so we all have our opinions on newt and sometimes he's with the public and sometimes he's not, but there he was entirely with the public. this is -- this is a provocative, interesting, delightful book so i want to get right to it. i want to start with my favorite sentence. my favorite sen
the noose himself for the sole reason that he was an american citizen. the united states consulate at kingston noticed that an american was among the accused and began putting pressure on the british government to release him. this was achieved on the same day that samuel clark, his associate, is also brought up and executed in a similar manner as gordon. the u.s. consul takes menard, whisks him away to kingston and places him on the next ship bound to new orleans. under u.s. government purchase, they bought him the ticket. menard's wife and young child were left behind in kingston. he didn't even have time to say good-bye to her, which comes up later in his career. he does reunite with the family and they are able to make it out of jamaica and to new orleans. when he leaves jamaica, is brought to new orleans, his stock rises instantly in the british empire as an eyewitness to the events that have just happened. this is an excerpt of a letter that he wrote to john stuart mill, the famous english classical liberal, sometimes member of parliament and intellectual leader of the mid-19
of enfranchising women, the united states is in the middle of the pack, you know, behind new zealand, 1893, the first western style democracy to enfranchise women, behind australia, behind great britain, ahead of portugal, 1976, ahead of kuwait, 2006. so the u.s. is sort of in the middle of the pack. and if elizabeth cady stanton had then told in 1888 that the female suffrage was something that was going to happen decades into the future i think she would have been disbelieving. she had a lot of confidence as did many other reformers that this was the right thing to do. it's interesting, however, that stanton doesn't mention the fact that women had already voted in a part of the united states. we talked about that in an earlier lecture. does any one remember where they used to vote? yeah, new jersey. they voted in new jersey for about a generation from the 1770s to the early 1800s then were disenfranchised, i think i mentioned this. they were disenfranchised because a member of the new jersey state legislature had lost a race earlier and he blamed it on women voters for some reason. it was
studies supported medical use of marijuana for treatment in the united states and no animal or human data supports the safety of marijuana for general medical use, end of quote. as required by the controlled substance act, the d.e.a. required a scientific and medical valuation and scheduling recommendation. and i quote, that marijuana, the stuff we are saying tonight -- anybody -- and you saw the "60-minute" piece, they come in, buy, they take. we are talking about doctors, the number of doctors ripping off people with objectiony continuin. the number of -- oxycotin. and go down to broward county in florida and go into the pain clinics. there are buses and planes coming down to buy it and doctors are writing prescriptions. so we are going to hide behind it? the number of doctors that ruin young people on oxycotin whereby they died, they died, the doctor says it's ok, but health and human services said, quote, marijuana has a high potential for abuse. has no accepted no medical use in the united states and lacks an acceptable level of safety. i think if this amendment passes and this becom
as appropriate leaders of the united states. >> you don't think there was anything interesting in talking about the constitution saying the age of the president and the birth place of the president and the citizenship of of the president, the long run-up to something about business which the romney campaign consistently says is their focus. margaret hoover come on. >> you said will cain and didn't get the answer you like. >> it's not the answer i like. i think you're not being honest with me. >> excuse me, when i'm accused of being dishonest you can be assured i will respond. >> good, you go. >> i think this is the unfortunate happenstance of including donald trump in your news coverage. we expand the narrative to assume that everything mitt romney says when he's speaking on the value of business experience that -- >> run that clip again. >> no, you can play it as soon as i'm done but let me finish this. >> i'm not saying every little thing. i'm saying this particular clip where he talks about changing the constitution because the age, the birth place, the citizenship and then goes on and talks
: after seven years of imprisonment blind activist chen guangcheng is now in the united states. this is brand-new video. he struck a deal with the chinese government to leave his homeland and study law at new york university. his fight for freedom sparking a diplomatic firestorm between china and the u.s. david lee miller more on this. >> it is a beautiful day in new york city especially beautiful for mr. chen, weather is perfect and he was out enjoying it. he was also enjoying something he hasn't seen a great deal of, his freedom. he came down from his apartment part of the housing for students and faculty at the campus. he spent some time in a private playground on the campus. he was using a wheelchair. he injured his right leg but for the most part he seemed to be in good spirits. he stayed 30 yards away from reporters, we were told that she not going to speak to the media and as much as possible he wanted his privacy. we were told not to take pictures of had his children. we arrived yesterday with his wife and two kids in a 13-hour flight from china. he landed at newark air
is recognized for five minutes. mr. fattah: the congress of the united states in a bipartisan vote passed the energy independence and security act of 2007. it was signed into law by president bush. it just suggests that in federal procurement when we seek an energy that the department should use, energy efficient sources, so that we don't rely on unnecessary middle eastern supplies for oil, this removes this requirement. so i hope we would vote against it. this has been a part of the law for a number of years now and has helped save taxpayers money. so i would ask for a no vote on the amendment. the speaker pro tempore: does the gentleman yield back? -- the chair: does the gentleman yield back? mr. fattah: i'd be glad to yield. mr. dicks: this is an effort to overturn a law that was passed in 2007 that says -- try to do the most energy efficient approach to running the government. i mean, i think -- mr. flores: if the gentleman will yield? mr. dicks: i think it's common sense and i urge a no vote on the amendment. the chair: does the gentleman yield his time? mr. fattah: i'd be glad to yi
are looking at these live images of the president of the united states along with the nato secretary general, welcoming in many of those leaders, all there in chicago for this nato summit. thanks so much, elise. >>> all right, right now, italy is serving the damage after a strong earthquake shook parts of the country earlier this morning. the u.s. geological survey says the epicenter of the 6.0 quake was just north of bologna. workers are still digging through the rubble, looking for survivors. at least seven people are dead and 50 injured. >>> a chinese activist is enjoying some rest and relaxation with family in new york today, but his journey here was a long and difficult diplomatic process. we'll talk to one of the people who made it possible. ♪ why do you whisper, green grass? ♪ [ all ] shh! ♪ why tell the trees what ain't so? ♪ [ male announcer ] dow solutions use vibration reduction technology to help reduce track noise so trains move quieter through urban areas all over the world. together, the elements of science and the human element can solve anything. [ all ] shh! [ male
was for it personally. he didn't say as president of the united states, personally. he saided that each state should make up its own decision which is a conservative view point states rights and the whole federalism. apparently process wise. >> that was a little twist i thought in the argument. he said one of the reasons he decided to come out hike this is because mitt romney called for a federal constitutional amendment saying at the federal level the constitution should ban gay marriage and he thinks it should be state bistate. as president that is not something that is likely to come to his desk. on the issue of gay marriage he is comfortable with it and think is states over time as the public opinion evolves will evolve with him. >> he won north carolina by half a percentage point last night. this year the democratic convention in north carolina and then you have last night's vote on the gay marriage constitutional amendment to the state constitution. what is the conventional wisdom of what this means for north carolina for this president? >> a couple of democrats felt like, north carolina, or m
these persons you claim as property are being used to wage war against the united states. i'm going to confiscate such property as contraband of war. and in august of 1861, congress would pass the first confiscation act that would apply to those being used in the confederate war effort. just anybody couldn't enter the camp. fort monroe, one cartoonist would call it the fort monroe doctrine, receiving the contraband. butler would allow women and children in. the children and the wives. of the soldiers, not soldiers, contraband, confiscated. he would allow them in. so you have really the first contraband camp of the war forming at fort monroe. butler would also be in association with abraham galloway as he returned to work with uncle sam. the confederates use african-american lay lor -- labor extensively. and allan pinkerton said that those were the best sources of information. those engaged in hard labor for the confederacy. those individuals, those colored men, persons of african descent are best source of information. and one african-american woman is noteworthy in the information
. and they counterattack. the slave owning elite in the united states, they fight back. and all slave owners did that throughout the 19th century. whenever anti-slavery movements get started in other parts of the world, in the british empire, in spain, in other places in central and south america, slave owners respond and they fight back. and they try their best to stop emancipation. they cling to that institution which has benefitted them so much. and in the united states that happens. slave owners notice right away that the abolitionist movement has geared up and these people are mounting a direct rhetorical attack on the institution. and they respond right away. this is the first sustained criticism of slavery as an institution since the revolution, so they fight back. and many of them are themselves politicians, public figures. many slave owners were also governors, members of the state legislature in the u.s. senate, and some of them actually became president of the united states as we said earlier. so they fight back. also newspapers editors, ministers, they know that this is a threat. and
. right now here in the united states we have basically three approaches to the obesity problem facing nato and u.s. spending. and the three options are basically this. they were alluded to in the last panel and i will go over them very briefly. essentially the republicans laid out various options for eating more. in other words the house has offered a proposal to add $4 billion on top of what the pentagon has asked for. okay. we know this proposal coming from the house republicans is not going anywhere in the senate but it is a good indication where the political tenor is and what that faction of the republican believes is a solution to the problem that faces us. they have also put forward an alternative to sequestration. i won't go into that. if we look at mitt romney's campaign he basically said we should spend and this is an estimate, as much as $2.1 trillion over the next decade than what the obama administration for instance has laid out. 2.1 dral trillion more. want to emphasize that, mo, more the not cutting more. what is the obama administration's proposal? more or less stay t
-circle here, it was from afghanistan they planned the attacks against the united states. 10 years ago, we went in and we have gotten them. a year ago. we got their number 1 leader who decimated their forces. we have their number one leader a year ago. now, a year leader, the president is signing this agreement that we are going to get out. but 223,000 troops by the end of the summer, but we are still going to be there by 2014. this war is going to drag on for another two and a half years. is that good enough? your comments on the president's trip, big surprise trip yesterday, certainly stole mitt romney's thunder. and certainly showed him as commander in chief. but do we have to let this thing drag on for another two and a half years? 866-55-press. you know the number. join the conversation, 866-55-77-377. >> this is the full court press. the bill press show. live on your radio and on current tv. politically direct means no b.s. just telling you what's going on in politics today. >>at the only on-line forum with a direct line to bill press. >>it's something i've b
in spain, the freezing of lending of capital throughout the world. and it is why the united states can't shake this recession. because it is not a recession. it is what is called the debt implex caused by debt. like the way they used to plead patients in the middle ages to get rid of the evil spirits and just made them worse. that is what he is doing really. >> greta: what he is running on is the statement it could have been so much worse and we are really lucky. how do we know if he is right? there could have been so much worse than he really sort of stopped the, you know, stopped all the problems from getting so much bigger or how do we know that he is not scaring us? >> look at every other country in the world, greta. we are the only country that did not bounce back from this recession. china had a 9%, 10% growth rate. india, high growth rate. the european zone came out of this recession a year and a half before we did and they had. >> greta: you have greece, you have unemployment in spain of 24%. i mean. >> now, you are. >> greta: europe is imploding. >> now, you are. it is 2012. i
for the united states, and that is a role that is far and beyond politician. -- politicks. citizens -- the department of justice is withholding documents. madam chairwoman, it should not have come to this. there are basic questions that the people in congress should have the right to have answer. who approved the tactic of gun walking? why was the criminal chief advocating for the tactic of gun walking on february 4, 2011, in mexico which is the very same day a demonstrably false letter was written to united states senator chuck grassley denying the tactic? on the very same day one is advocating for it, a letter was sent on department of justice letterhead denying the tactic. how did it ever get drafted and sent on d.o.j. letterhead? was gun walking alluded to in the wiretapping applications? and if so, who missed it? when the president said he did not approve of fast and furious and neither did eric holder, how did he know it? he said that in march of 2011. these are but five questions in a we do not have the answers to despite one solid year of asking. so, madam chairwoman, this
. washington was skeptical from the claim. >> i think all of us here in the united states were surprised, disappointed and angry about the release. >> back in tripoli, he said i have never harmed anyone in my life. the truth is still hidden. >> some counterterrorism experts admit there were flaws in his trial. >> with his death, the change of the regime in libya, i think is -- although not a fully satisfying one -- the end of the story of terrorism in libyan terrorism. >> but others think the libyan was only a scapegoat. >> with his demise, there is no clearer account of what happened. >> but not the questions. nbc news, london. >>> now we're going to switch gears and talk about the weather and tropical storm alberto churning off the coast of south carolina. chris is upstairs with the latest. >> good morning, jenna. tropical storm alberto is the first storm of the season. in fact, it's just about two weeks early at the beginning of hurricane season. cannot read too much into that as the predictor or the rest of the season, but it just takes once for it to be a bad season. one could be a
, as much business in the united states. we would be working in other countries, other just exdids more heavily without the loans or the mandates. >> mr. ahern would you say the same thing, that you would, your malaysia factory would be still selling in europe and you would still be in business and s&p 500 listed company if not for domestic mandates and guaranties? >> we would still be a successful company but we would not be in the financial condition, sound financial condition we're in and we would not have successfully entered the u.s. utility market. we would be a smaller company without this. >> isn't it true that if not for a waiver as to the car sin owe against, that are in our pvs in fact you wouldn't even be in the european union at all? you needed a waiver for your technology to be fielded? >> no, that is not true. the product isn't car sin owe againic. there is a material, that is stable compound. >> but need ad waiver in the european union for you to field it, didn't you? >> it didn't, no. >> it didn't? you didn't rely on a single study paid for in order to convince people o
if not thousands of cases of unlawfully detained u.s. citizens and legal residents in the united states each year in violation of their constitutional rights. some of them have even been deported and then been brought back to the united states of america. that's not an old story, that's a story of today. the federal government took a step in the right direction when it legally challenged the show me your papers laws in alabama, south carolina, and arizona. because the state laws are unconstitutional and interfere with the federal government's authority to set and enforce immigration policy. but it makes so sense to file suit -- mow sense to file suit against unconstitutional laws on one hand and on the other hand allow the same laws to funnel people into deportation centers and deportation pipeline. gabino has been denied relief from deportation because he's been stopped too many times, according to the federal government, for driving without a license. the government is complicit in serial profiling because while the states cannot deport gabino and break up his family of american citizens, the f
in his legal career, he served as a prosecutor in the united states attorneys offices of san francisco and boston. after working as a partner in the boston law firm, director mueller return to the justice department in 1989 as an assistant to the attorney general and later as the head of the criminal division. in 1998, director mueller was named the united states attorney in san francisco, a position he held until 2001 when he was nominated to be director of the fbi. director mueller, once again, we welcome you today. we look forward to your statement. if you will please proceed. good morning and thank you, chairman smith, ranking member conyers and members of the committee. i do want to thank you for the opportunity to appear before the committee today. i think you for your continued support of the men and women of the fbi. as you know and have pointed out, the bureau has undergone unprecedented change in recent years, since the attacks of september 11, we have refocused efforts to address and prevent emerging terrorist threats. the terrorist threat is more diverse than it was 10 year
united states. it's one of the cheap engines of the whole economy. and that cotton goes to principally to one country, that country is -- great britain, right. the textile mill owners in england want american cotton. it has a reputation for being very fine cotton, high quality cotton. so, there's a lot of money at stake here. there is a lot of wealth at stake. and even though the 19th century is called the century of emancipation because that's when so many societies finally turn away from slavery, we must always remember there's a strong counter attack from slave owners who are trying to hold onto it. and when we look at the pro slavery argument i think we should bear in mind that an english man once said that when we study history, we often study behavior by earlier generations, this seems to us to be disgraceful. seems to us to be reprehensible. i think all thinking adults today would agree about that point about the pro slavery argument. i mean, slavery has almost no defenders today. in world opinion has changed dramatically since the 19th century. in the 1830s and 40s and 50s, thi
needs 270 to become president of the united states. minnesota will do so this november. also on election day you have got maryland, washington that will vote on same-sex marriage. it's something that will be on a lot of ballots as we head forward. bill: got a fox news alert. massive explosions rocking damascus, syria. the assad regime claiming an attack killed 55, wounding 400. the force of the blast creating compounds leaving massive craters. if the reports are true it's the deadliest attack in the capital since the uprising began. it's getting worse in syria. a difficult place to get information, though. martha: we have a lot of stories and those are a few of them coming up in america's newsroom on a thursday. an entire school, every single student was sent home for the day, and not for bad behavior. bill: new questions about voting and possible voter fraud in a critical battleground states. could hundreds or thousands of non-citizens be registered to cast a ballot? martha: serious concerns about the latest terror threat. why al qaeda may be looking to place bombs in household pets. >>
manually by people and great control centers all over the united states. they were 21st day, seven days a week and they have to maintain the balance on a minute by minute basis all throughout the day. the second thing we need to learn is that his technology can fail for a really long time and still end up becoming something completely ubiquitous to the way we live. i think there's a lot of analogies between the history of the life of an history of solar power because i've had people tell me, while solar cells were invented in 1840s, people out pushed this is the energy solutions the 1970s, but they're still expensive and so not really widely used, so clearly they are a failure and we should move on. if you look at the history of the label, you can see technology can fill on a technological basis for 80 years hentgen fail for another 40 and still end up having something we are completely dependent upon today. finally, we need to learn that it changes the completely sweep the nation are not necessarily things that happened individual by individual. we don't have an electric grid system to
that the united states government outed dr. afridi, thereby leading to his prison sentence. are you standing behind that? >> yes, i do bill. several things here. one in the immediate days after the killing of bin laden had sources in the government talking about d.n.a. samples, how he wanted to compare d.n.a. then soon after that the pakistanis started to lock up various health officials and there was a story in the british papers and also in the news how the officials in our government were off the record confirming that there was a doctor used by the cia to obtain d.n.a. samples. that was two officials in the government that confirmed that. it was mcclatchey then. the worse thing though bill was earlier this year in january, leon panetta went on "sixty minutes and told how the doctor was a cia asset and working for us to obtain. >> bill: he was in custody by that time. and we called and we can't get names attached to this and i hate to do that but the administration denies what you are saying and says that the pakistanis picked up afridi themselves that they knew he was working with the ci
. what has he done as the president of the united states over the past four years? has he established the revitalization he promised to bring? did he hold unemployment over 8%? it has been 39 months. that hasn't happened. >> in that interview with time, go have romney says his years with bain taught him a lot about why companies succeed and fail. in each of his answers to four questions, he also took time to critique the president's economic credentials. >> this is a president who spends his time blaming other people for the fact that he has been unsuccessful in turning around this economy. i think the reason you are seeing across the country, people saying they would like to try someone new, because they believe this president, while he may be a nice guy, is simply not up to the task of helping guide an economy. >> you are looking at a live picture right here. that's president obama speaking at a fund-raiser just moments ago. the president responded saying governor romney has drawn the wrong lessons from his time running bain capital. the exchanges are getting more personal as the st
. and on that i just want to say that every dollar the united states spends on old and unnecessary programs is a dollar we lose from new necessary strategic investments. as secretary panetta said, if we had an open bank account we would keep all of it. but we don't have an open bank account. so when something is added to our budget that is not needed, we are forced to take out something that matters. from force structure, readiness, modernization, for from the health of the all volunteer force. when we are forced to hold on to older, less capable systems, so others can pick one item or another that they favor, but we have to balance them all. and we have a responsibility to sequester. i want to say one word about that awful prospect up front. people ask are we planning for sequestration? the secretary of defense has said no, we are not. maybe later in the summer o.m.b. will have to request we look at it and determine what steps can be taken. i don't want to mislead you here. planning has a certain rational tone to it. but congress in writing the budget control act did not design sequester t
somebody would want to compromise the security of the president of the united states, with knowing that secret service agents are in town and have a predilection to partying would try to engage them and learn information about the president's path. >> two of the six secret service agents who offered to resign after the colombia mess, we are told, are now fighting to hold on to their jobs. so secret service is going to go after their security clearances. shep? >> shepard: mike emanuel live on capitol hill. now to our good friends and trusted allies in pakistan. case in point, the man who helped hunt down the world's most wanted terrorist. he just got a reward from the pakistanis. 33 years in prison. that's the sentence that pakistani officials who just ordered for a doctor who helped the united states track down usama bin laden. the doctor's crime? conspiring against the state. he ran a fake vaccination program to collect d.n.a. intelligence teams to make sure bin laden was at that compound. the pentagon points out he was working against al qaeda. not against pakistan. and the senio
a fund-raising meeting of sorts, where the united states is going to be asking other countries, other member nations of nato to help contribute to the cost of securing afghanistan after 2014. it's going to cost upwards of $4 billion a year. and of course, u.s. officials don't want all of that to come out of u.s. taxpayer dollars. >> all right, chuck todd, thanks very much. let's bring in david gregory, moderator of "meet the press." good morning, good to see you. >> good morning, lester. >> these supports, the g-8 and nato conference, it's all about the president trying to get world leaders on the same page, in the first case about the euro debt crisis, the second case of nato on afghanistan. how important is it for the president, and has he found consensus on any of these issues? >> well, it's still very difficult going, i think, as you deal with europe in particular. and the fact that the same debate they're having there is what we're going to have in the united states, which is how do you make the economy grow better? do you slash the budget in order to get growth or not? and a lot
overseas trip for francois hollande if he is elected this evening will be to the united states. there is a nato summit and a g8 summit that are happening in washington and chicago in just a few weeks. his first will be to berlin because, of course, the franco-german friendship is crucial, and the second will be to the united states if he is elected. that's when he will get to meet barack obama, the u.s. president. the one tiny issue between france and the u.s. were there. not exactly on the same page. if it's francois hollande, afghanistan -- he said he wants to withdraw all french troops from afghanistan by the end of this year. nicolas sarkozy, the incumbent has said he will wait until next year. randy. >> it has been an interesting race. things got pretty heated in a debate last week with sarkozy calling hollande a liar. >> reporter: well, what happened is that, yes, it did become personal. you don't feel that these two men like each other on a personal level. it got a bit heated when sarkozy kept using the word lie, and that's where francois hollande said why do you keep us
down by the united states, that while in the embassy, he was cut off from the news and he was encouraged to leave. when he left, he went to the hospital, he met his wife, and his wife told him what had been happening to her ever since he fled. she told him that the guards who were locking them down in their village took her away, tieder h to a chair and interrogated her, said they were waiting for them with weapons back in their house. chen told me very clearly that if he stays in china, he fears for his life. initially he wanted to stay in the country. he says he can no longer live it there as a free man. he wants to leave and he wants to leave as soon as possible. he's made this appeal directly to president barack obama himself saying he must do more about human rights in china. he wants to leave china. if he stays here, he says he will not live. as far as his wife is concerned, she says will eays this is not she wants to bring her children up in and she feels they no longer have a future here. a very different story to the one we were hearing earlier from the united sta
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